Sep 302013
 

This month’s article in the Working on the Web section of the Beau Monde forum explains the advantages of offering a blogroll at your blog. Though you may hesitate to include links to other blogs at yours, once you read this article you will understand how a blogroll can benefit both you and your readers. If you already have a blog or are thinking of starting one, this article will provide you with important information on why you will want to include a blogroll.

Would you like to have access to the online edition of the Oxford English Dictionary? The OED is a valuable tool for any writer of historical fiction because it allows them to verify whether a word in their manuscript was actually in use during the time in which their story is set. The print version has been discontinued and now all additions and updates go only into the online version. Though an annual subscription to the online OED can be beyond the budget of many writers, there are options for writers to get access. Next month’s Working on the Web article will explain how that can be accomplished.

If you are not yet a Beau Monde member, and would like to join us, please visit our Membership page for details.

Sep 242013
 

A cross-post from The Regency Redingote:

The fraction was 5/16 of an inch, the lives saved were those of bees, honey bees. Literally millions and millions of bees were saved by this little space, which came to be known as "bee space." The value of this small space was not finally understood until the second year of the young Queen Victoria’s reign, by a beekeeper in Poland. But there were many humane thinkers across Europe, from the late eighteenth century right though the Regency, who actively sought some means by which to prevent the killing of so many honey bees at the end of every summer.

The story of the space that kept the bees buzzing …

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Sep 202013
 

Do you have a home office where you do most of your writing? Do you sometimes wonder how other authors set up their home offices? Then, today, you are in luck. Cheryl Bolen, award-winning Regency romance author, tells us how she has set up her home office. Those of you who are not committed technophiles will find some very clever, but functional, low-tech solutions in Cheryl’s article.

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Sep 162013
 

Today, Susanna Ives, author of Rakes and Radishes, shares the research she did on the British mail delivery system while writing that book. She includes excerpts from several historical works on the subject, as well as some from books published during the period known as the "long Regency." Do you need to know the price of postage for a letter delivered within the British Isles? Or, is you fictional missive to be sent abroad for delivery in a foreign land? Susanna provides postage tables in her article for convenient reference. In her article, you will also find details on which coaches served which cities and the business hours of the London Post Office, among other details of the British postal system.

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Sep 122013
 

A cross-post from The Regency Redingote:

Over the years, I have read dozens of Regency romances which include a scene in the bath. The hero may or may not be present while the heroine bathes, but one thing which is always close at hand is a bar of soap. Yet during the Regency, bar soap was extremely expensive, used only by the affluent classes. Bar soap, something so ubiquitous today we take it for granted. Yet, it was only in the last decade of the eighteenth century that a French chemist patented a method of making bar soap which should have helped to reduce the cost, making it available to more people. Before that time, those of modest means were more likely to use the less expensive soft soap.

A brief history of how soap lathered its way to the Regency …

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Sep 082013
 

Jane Lark, author of the recently-released romance novel, Illicit Love, has done a lot of reseaarch into the lives of real Georgian and Regency women for her books. In today’s article, she shares one of those true stories with us. This one is about a Miss L– and her amorous adventures in the Bath of Beau Nash. In fact, the famous Master of Ceremonies was complicit in this curious affair.

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Sep 042013
 

The Regency had places where one could go to see wild and exotic animals. One of the most famous was the Royal Menagerie at the Exeter Exchange. But this London amusement had very little in common with the scientifically-managed zoological parks of modern times. Today, Regency romance author, and Beau Monde past President, Regina Scott, provides us with some details of the Menagerie at the Exeter ‘Change. Do you think you would have enjoyed a visit to the Royal Menagerie?

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